How do i find a written recipe from a YouTube Video

karennoca

Well-known member
I watched Rachael Cooks with Love making a great pot roast in her Dutch Oven. She used a chuck roast, cooked with carrots, celery and onion first, then removed those veggies after 90 minutes, then added fresh veggies back in. It had the most beautiful gravy, but I have searched high and low and cannot find a written recipe to copy off. any suggestions?
 
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charley2

Well-known member
I think that technique of cooking with the veggies and then adding new for serving is such a good idea. I have even seen the cooked veggies put through a food mill and added to the gravy/stew sauce.
Here is an article that talks us through making a good stew--and the part about not overcooking the veggies sort of speaks to the Youtube recipe you watched.
I would add mushrooms also, and if only cooking enough to get the veggies tender maybe some small new potatoes. The article talks about "thick gravy" for a stew, and I have found if I thought my liquid wasn't quite thick enough I've added small amounts of instant potato flakes for a thickener.

Hope that helps
 

karennoca

Well-known member
Thanks Charley, I watched the video again, and wrote it down as she went along. I really like this gal, very down to earth, sweet, and food I like to eat. I had remembered most of it, except for the herbs at the start. I love pot roast, but always felt like something was missing from the ones I made. Can't wait to try this method of the double veggies. I've been cooking since I was 11 years old, am now 81 years old. One would think I would have learned how to make a good pot roast!
 

karennoca

Well-known member
I read the article from Spruce Eats and was curious about their statement on not coating the beef with flour prior to searing as it makes for a gloppy stew. Rachael's stew did not look gloppy, the gravy looked the perfect thickness and appealing. She even added a little flour to the first round of veggies, and said to be sure to cook the flour as the raw flour did not do justice to the pot roast. Science versus opinions...
 

marg-cdn2

Well-known member
This was under the video. Is it helpfu?
RACHEL COOKS WITH LOVE (All videos) https://youtube.com/channel/UCWZ_8BX5... This as a delicious fall apart tender pot roast recipe, I cook it slow, and it is smothered in a heavenly gravy that is made with sweet carrots, onions, celery and perfect seasoning. I love to side my pot roast with mashed potatoes and homemade dinner rolls, it is a meal fit for a King. This hearty dinner recipe takes me back to my childhood when my mom often fixed it on weekends and it was one plate I licked clean. This pot roast recipe can be prepared with no effort at all, and it is a meal that is complete. Nothing beats a classic pot roast dinner, it is a perfect meal to serve when having company or just a special treat for the family...I always choose a nice big chuck roast, then season it well, prep it and before you know it you have a hearty delicious dinner ready to impress. Along with my seasoning, I like to add fresh rosemary, thyme, garlic and good chicken and beef stock and 1 good Tbsp of bacon grease for added flavor. My pot roast is ready to enjoy after about 3 hours, every minute is worth it. INGREDIENTS ... 325° (3 hours) 3&1/2 LB. Chuck roast (NOT shoulder if possible) (look for the marbling) kosher salt (as needed) Pepper (fresh ground) 2 tsp onion powder 2 tsp garlic powder 1 C. plus 3-5 Tbsp All purpose flour 1-3 Tbsp vegetable oil 1 tbsp bacon grease 5 medium carrots (divided) 2 Medium large onions 3 celery ribs (divided) 3 large garlic cloves (mashed) Rosemary (2 big sorigs) Thyme (2 sprigs) 3 C. Chicken stock (you decide) 1 C. beef broth 1 Tbsp tomato paste 1 tsp red wine vinegar (optional) 1 C. crushed tomatoes 2 Bay leaves 1/2 tsp Kitchen bouquet (optional) SIDES Mashed potatoes dinner rolls
 

charley2

Well-known member
I read the article from Spruce Eats and was curious about their statement on not coating the beef with flour prior to searing as it makes for a gloppy stew. Rachael's stew did not look gloppy, the gravy looked the perfect thickness and appealing. She even added a little flour to the first round of veggies, and said to be sure to cook the flour as the raw flour did not do justice to the pot roast. Science versus opinions...
I also found that to be problematic IME but I have done stew both ways--floured and not. I always flour my cube steak for courntry fried steak and onions. And do cook the flour well. Glad Marge found more explanation.
 

karennoca

Well-known member
Thanks so much, I enjoy many of the YouTube videos but drives me nuts not to have the written recipe. Going to make this over the weekend, will report back.
 

mariadnoca

Moderator
If they’ve written the recipe in their comment section (and a pox of them if they didn’t) you should be able to access while watching on you tube by clicking where I’ve circled in green in the two examples:
 

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karennoca

Well-known member
The pot roast turned out fabulous. My meat cutter lady at our local neighborhood market introduced me to a cut of beef to use instead of fatty chuck roast. They have Sterling Silver meats, and the cut is called Choice Sirloin Tip roast. It has become very popular, looks like a chuck roast but less fat, and what fat does congeal is an off white rather than the orangey color from a chuck cut. It was fall apart tender, and the meat remained very moist. I loved the technique of flouring the meat and veggies. I put the carrot, celery, and my tweak of fennel in during the last hour. Onions and garlic went in at the beginning. I did not use the Kitchen Bouquet as the gravy was perfect, so smooth, silky. Did not use all the amounts of liquid called for as my roast was smaller, instead of one cup of crushed tomatoes, I used the entire 14.5 ounce can.
 
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